Tuesday, 9 June 2009

Ulster Heritage Forum Now Open

The Ulster Heritage Forum is now open. It is a service open to all with Ulster ancestry. The forum's moderator is Jim McKane of Wiarton, Ontario, Canada. The forum concentrates on family history and genealogy and is unique in that it also includes new information that has been revealed from the Ulster Heritage DNA Project.

Ulster Heritage Forum

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

On the home page ~ "Samhain" should appear as such : NO accent on the 'a'.

Barb Braswell said...

Would the name Lowry indicate that their arrival in East Donegal appeared at the time of Ludovic or earlier?

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know how common it was for Scottish surnames to be altered or even changed once upon entering Ulster? I ask because my Y-DNA says emphatically I am a Campbell. There is a certain DNA signature that is found mainly with men surnamed Campbell and even though men of other surnames can have sequences similar to it, the only exact matches I ever have are with people named Campbell and no one else. The thing is, my surname is not Campbell nor is it one of the sept names of Clan Campbell. In fact, it's a name not even remotely thought to be related or connected to Clan Campbell historically and there are no records of adoption anywhere on my father's side at least back to the 1700's.I am from America, and my only guess at this point is one possibility is that they may or may not have been Campbells originally in Scotland, but either upon coming to Ulster or here to America, they completely changed their name entirely for some reason.I don't have the paper trail to figure it all out yet, but it's interesting. Whether they were Campbells or not, my Y-DNA does not match any of the other signatures for men with my surname on any genetic testing website and I can go to any Campbell surname testing site, whether FTDNA or otherwise and always get 100% perfect matches every time with my DNA signature, even though my surname is in no way connected to Clan Campbell or even one of the sept names of the Clan either.What makes it harder, is that my own surname is the 2nd most common name in all of Scotland...and probably all of America and the U.K. for that matter, also.But it's interesting what you can learn about your family history with DNA testing. I knew I had alot of Scotch-Irish ancestry, but since my father's name was so common and typical I never thought his surname was be Scotch-Irish as well until I did the Y-DNA test.

Anonymous said...

In the southern U.S. we are always taught that the "Scotch-Irish" came from both Ulster and directly from the Anglo-Scottish Border Region to America. But does anyone truly know just how many truly came from Ulster compared to how many came directly from the Scottish Lowlands or the Scottish Border itself to America at the same time? Because they all got lumped in as the Scotch-Irish in America, so how many actually came from Anglo-Scottish Border directly to America?

The Ulster-Scots and the Anglo-Scots all became known as the Scotch-Irish in the southern part of North America.

Barry R McCain said...

That is a very good point. 'Scots-Irish' is really a catch-all term as it is used today. Many Scots-Irish are not historically from Ulster. Example would be Jim Bowie, his family direct from Scotland. The even among the Ulster Scots-Irish, many are of Highland Scottish or even native Irish ancestry. There were Highland Scottish migrations to Ulster in the 1500s... and many of these 'became' Scots-Irish, there were also large scale conversions to the Reformed Faith by native Irish, especially in the Bann Valley, the also became Scots-Irish. In the Ulster Heritage DNA Project we have had many Scots-Irish discover their roots are native Irish or Highland Scots. Just one of those interesting aspects of history that is often left out in popular history of Scots-Irish.

Barry R McCain said...

In the DNA project I can tell you two origins of Campbell have turned up. Most are Highland Scots from mid Argyll. Clann Chaimbeul sponsored a settlement in east Donegal and northwest Tyrone in the 1500s, many of these Campbell date to that event. There is also a native Irish family that anglicised their surname as Campbell, the Mac Cathmhaoil family. This has been confirmed via DNA testing.